25 Comments
Dec 7, 2023Liked by Joshua P. Hill

goddamn I was just having this very conversation with a friend. WE ARE WITH YOU. Solidarity Comrades. Moving words in this post. We will not look away.

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I get it, Joshua, and I'm so sad that the person with that clear voice was killed.

Self care, in the form of a rest, a conversation with a friend, or a nap is essential to prevent burnout but I agree, we have to keep going.

This genocide happening before our very eyes in unacceptable.

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Very inspiring

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Thank you once again Joshua. Such an important message right now. I have always had an issue with the concept. I think resistance is resistance, and rest is rest. Both important, but not the same thing to be sure.

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Dec 7, 2023Liked by Joshua P. Hill

Thank you for your words, Joshua. Your posts provide a continual sway toward the moment when I feel myself turning my head toward the sand. I'm wondering if when you say rest is not revolution, is this different than rest as resistance? I've also avoided and detached from the idea of self-care over the past several years, but I'm curious about not seeing rest as the revolution, particularly after reading Tricia Hersey's Rest Is Resistance. I appreciate anything you can offer, and if it's no comment, that is okay, too. I think in this idea of "rest," it's also about prioritizing what you give energy to, and at this moment, I honor more direct action rather than fielding comments. In solidarity.

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I subscribe and support this Substack even though I fundamentally disagree with most of what you write about the war in Gaza. I do it, because I want to understand as best I can the views of my idealogical opponents on this issue.

The words "on this issue" are important. I wish you would broaden your writing to focus now and then on issues here in America without always weaving in Gaza.

For example, what about poverty in America? What does Gaza have to do with that? When you're trying to have impact, you always have to ask yourself where do I have agency.

I think you also have to ask yourself whether you are indirectly helping Trump by so bitterly criticizing Biden. If part of the protest leads progressives to not vote for Biden because of his policy in iIsrael, that is the same as a vote for Trump.

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Yes. 👏🏻 I feel (and hope) that we are experiencing the final violent flailings of our collective colonial capitalist nightmare. That in its place we are forced to begin the painful and necessary work of building fierce, authentic community, born of the cell-deep understanding that none of us are free until we’re all free. 🇵🇸

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Hey Josh you seem fairly well connected to these groups I have donated the small amount of money I could to hot meals in Gaza, but what I have is time. I want to help make a difference, I can't be out in the streets like I would like to, but I am taking care of a person in hospice which affords me like 3 or 4 hours a day. If 60 some percent of America wants a ceasefire, then I think 20% of Americans, even on a cold call style would donate to humanitarian aid. I just gave 25$ and I don't even have 1000$ to my name. How can I help, do you or anyone else reading this have any suggestions? I don't have a platform or I would use that. But I have time and a desire to make an impact

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All of this and the points in your follow-up are so important. Keep bringing hope and courage to others to do the small things that we can all do to help. Like you said in your follow-up, often we can find energy in others, in being around people who share our goals and we can push each other to stay motivated. Plus, a huge part of motivation comes from going out and doing things. When we play video games all day (something I do often), we can eventually get out of practice of taking action and it becomes easier and easier to become apathetic.

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“The narrative of self-care, which initially was about boundaries and rest, has shifted over time to look more like paying for treats and certain luxuries.” Thank you for this.

Also, just want to note that Jewish Voice for Peace was quoting Palestinian writer Hala Alyan in its post “We owe Gaza endurance”

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As I read your essay it was with the sort of sinking sensation that often accompanies a truth that’s not half as pleasant as you feel it ought to be. It’s really quite terrible, isn’t it? I’m comfortably optimistic, but when I look around at my peers there’s a worrisome sort of disconnect between us all. I don’t blame any of them. I think it’s quite a predictable reality. Every one of us has half a million things to do and half a million things to think about (worry about) doing. And, if you couldn’t tell, I’m quite young. So I think many of us are bothered by this and that, and too busy trying to figure out what to do with all this adult business to spare a spot of empathy or acknowledgement to a people outside the US. Frankly, a fair few hesitate to spare a bit of empathy for those in the US at all.

I’m not going anywhere in particular with this--- it’s just the thoughts that bubbled up throughout the essay (which I quite enjoyed). If I had to try and make a cohesive statement from my thoughts it would be that until we manage to try and slap together a more cohesive support system we’ll have a fair amount of trouble caring about the whole world. I say this specifically about young people, because many of my classmates are good souls who feel strongly about the subject of Palestine, the tragedies they are experiencing, and the war crimes committed against them. But half the time they go home and take a nap and struggle through the next day and the next and the next. As your essay says, caring for ourselves is not an individual task. And that’s how they’re all approaching it (a fault of which I’m hardly innocent) and it’s all rather bad. But, as Mr. Moon of the animated movie “Sing” said: when you hit rock bottom the only way left to go is up. I’m praying society doesn’t try to dig sideways, but I have faith in our ability to grow.

One odd aside; I do to some extent blame the structural lack of support for teen spaces. In a car focused space with little public venues not requiring money, we’re very limited in meeting. My school is comfortably mid-- you’d never call it luxurious but we keep trucking along. I think the most connected groups I encounter are those in programs like the theater and the art classes. I’m passionate about education so I think that sort of prioritization of space for connection and exploration for students may be something I try and focus on building.

This whole comment is a pretty specific yet commonplace perspective but I think that engaging this way definitely improved my understanding of your work. Ah, my English teachers must be right when they’re talking about all those response essays. Expected, yet still fun to confirm.

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thank you Joshua for these strong resources and even stronger words. We're all losing our minds over these crises, but the loss has to create resilience and focus and love. for Gaza, we keep going

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I think it's safe to say your post the other day hit home, as hope for the world, hope for my personal life, just hope is dwindling

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Well I no doubt am gunna play some video games and self medicate(get lit)

Not just from the pain of seeing so much death of highly vulnerable and yet so strong children, women & men in Gaza, Congo, Yemen, Syria, and so many other conflict zones. But my father is dying, I have been a target of an asshole agency, federal of course, running out lies on my name and hacking my devices, pretty much a pile of stress and misery.

I don't believe rest is revolution, & I sure can't afford a spa day. I try to make whatever I can in way of contributing to the struggle.

I wish you were right

When you said "when the revolution ends" it won't.

Hopefully progress will be made and it will, along the way. But a fight for a better earth a better society for the 99% is a lifelong fight. You rest when you're dead. But taking breaks is key. Not as many as I do. If I had a platform I would find myself much more involved because there is so much that needs to be shared. But I quit most social, I use this app the most.

But thanks for the list, I got on newsletters & called my senator again, who I/we should bug everyday. I let her know if she took money from AIPAC, that shit should be banned, next time I'll get into that a bit more.

I used to meditate daily, then I felt a disconnect, my life had so much pain and misery, I am just now reconnecting sorta.

Any way sorry I just bled out a little, split my emotional purse. Anyway carry on

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I know that it’s sad that Alareer is gone. In October I attempted to reach out to him pleading him to leave while he still can. I tried to reach out to our shared sense of humanity even though we were from different sides saying I didn’t want to see him die. But he coldly rejected my suggestion and said this was my people’s fault. And then I lost some personal sympathy for him shortly after when I learned that he had called most Jews evil and outright praised Hamas in the past, not to mention that his own brother was a Hamas fighter and played a bee on the notorious pro-terrorism show Tomorrow’s Pioneers (Look it up, be prepared to see one of the most deranged kids programs ever). I’m not saying that he deserved to be killed, he didn’t. It was not his fault that he lived in one of the most closed off, overpopulated and violent places on earth. But I learned around that time that there are civilian casualties in war that are pure innocents or people who aren’t actually collaborators but still approve in some way (they still should not be murdered and have a chance at changing their views once the fighting is over.), and that people on both sides of a conflict will see terrible terroristic acts by their government as heroic righteous fury

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